What is a loose framing?

Framing is used mainly to direct the viewers’ attention. Different framing techniques can be accomplished by manipulating the viewpoint of the camera in relation to the objects in the frame. Loose or wide framing is the composition technique where there is plenty of empty space left around the main subject(s) in a shot. It can express freedom, isolation, or dreaming – that is up to you, the creator!

Loosely framed shots tend to be longer, giving time for the subject to move around in the frame.

The emotional impact of loose framing

The position and perspective of the viewer has a great impact on their view of the subject, and possibly the interpretation or decoding of the image. A loosely framed shot allows the viewer to gather more information about the subject’s environment. The surroundings become part of the storytelling, with empty spaces often implying a sense of loneliness or forlornness, or in certain cases, freedom.

Other framing types

In contrast, tight framing puts the frame very close around the subject, filling up the shot almost entirely. This framing is ideal to direct the focus of the viewer purely on the subject and showcase it in greater detail, drawing attention to colors or patterns.

Using medium framing is a neutral middle ground, which by itself does not evoke strong emotions from the viewer.

Need more help on framing the perfect shot? Check out these framing tips on Videomaker.com.

How to make a loose framing shot

The framing of a shot is mainly influenced by the angle of view. You can impact this by changing your distance to the subject, and the focal length of your lens. For a loosely framed shot, you either need to be far from your subject or use a wide-angle lens with a short focal length (24-35mm).

If you plan to get a tightly framed shot, you can either get close to your subject or if you’re a wildlife photographer, stick to a telephoto lens (70mm+)! Alternatively, you can also crop your pictures if they are high definition.